Alabama Woman ADMITS to Preparing More than $1 Million in Fraudulent PPP Loans! Jail Time Eminent!


We've all been hearing about the PPP, or Paycheck Protection Program, Loans that business were getting last year during the pandemic. Well, we also know that there were people who made up fictitious businesses in order to scam the government for money. Those people have been looking over their shoulder for nearly a year as the government closes in on them by double checking the legitimacy of every business who received federal funds.


Corine Campbell, left, of Saraland, Alabama has plead guilty, in a written statement, to helping others scam the government, and now SHE is facing charges as well. Campbell admitted to assisting several other people with their fraudulent paperwork and helping them to receive more than $1 million in funding.


According to Fox News 10, Campbell also pleaded guilty to a charge of being a felon in possession of a handgun. That charge arose from a search that federal agents conducted of her Saraland apartment. They found a pistol, which Campbell was not allowed to have because of a 2012 theft conviction in Baldwin County.


Campbell admitted that she helped prepare the applications for people under the program, designed to help businesses impacted by the pandemic. Two of those people were convicted felons who were in prison when they purportedly were operating their businesses, according to the plea document.



Court records show Campbell helped filed the paperwork for Demetrius “Demetric” Richardson (right) and Leroy Vidal Jackson. Richardson, who recently got out of federal prison after serving time for on a drug charge, also has a murder charge pending.


Jackson (below) already has pleaded guilty. Federal charges are pending against Richardson.



Both men received $20,832 under the Paycheck Protection Program. Jackson claimed he was self-employed as a landscaper and that his business had income of $106,788 in 2019, according to court records. At that time, though, Jackson was serving a 20-year sentence for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute drugs.


Richardson’s application claimed he ran a janitorial services company.


According to Campbell’s plea agreement, she forged credit union statements showing that Jackson and Richardson had the exact same balance – $10,044.77.

Law enforcement investigators, during the search of Campbell’s apartment, seized her iPhone and discovered text messages between her and Jackson discussing the fraudulent scheme, according to the plea document. Campbell also admitted to using the messaging service WhatsApp to communicate.


Now listen, anybody who has a criminal mind KNOWS that you don't make up something fake for two different people with the same exact amount on it. That raises red flags! It's clear that Campbell is knew to the scamming profession so her legal counsel is asking the judge for leniency.


Campbell has agreed to a plea deal after writing her statement about her involvement and is due back in court in April.


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